Esperanto Magazine: the Melbourne Edition

Originally published through Esperanto Magazine

I was the editor of Esperanto Magazine for the Exploration Edition, which involved commissioning and editing all articles; working with contributors to help bring out their best; and working in a tight close-knit team with the art director and marketing director, to create a cohesive whole that made us all proud.

Message from Esperanto: 

We love Melbourne! This is the greatest city in the world, end of discussion. The music, the bars, the food, the coffee, the art, the diversity, the skyline, the environment, the opportunities, the people…everything except the weather. As far as we’re concerned, this place is pretty much perfect. So, we’ve put together an entire edition dedicated to how freakin’ wonderful it is.

We’ve found that there’s so much going on here that it can sometimes get a little hard to keep track of it all. Don’t worry though, we’re here to help you out. Emily Neilsen has put together a guide to being a tourist in your own city, and Mary Harmer’s got your creativity fix sorted. Thirsty? Grab a drink from a microbrewery, thoroughly researched and highly recommended by William Field-Papuga. Horny? Aleczander Gamboa investigates the Flinders Street gay sauna. 

As much as we hate to admit, though, Melbourne does have its flaws. Jess Glaser questions why we ignore the homeless, while Emily Wilson has some choice words for drug culture snobbery. Anna Harcourt, on the other hand, is imploring motorists and cyclists to share the roads safely, and Nirvana Bhandary has put together a thoughtful reflection on multiculturalism. 

On a bit of a sad note, unfortunately, this is our last edition for 2014! We’d like to take this opportunity to thank all of our contributors for their incredible work throughout the year. You have blown us all away with your creativity, hard work, and crazy-talented skills. We are forever grateful for your efforts in making this magazine what it is. And of course, to all of our beautiful readers, thank you thank you thank you!

Keep reading Esperanto over the next few years, we’re so excited to see what next year’s team comes up with – we’re sure it’ll be amazing!

Proud Melburnians,
Frances, Jess, and Sarah 

 

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Contents:

Melbourne edition playlist
Mary Harmer delivers the soundtrack to our streets

A love letter to Melbourne
Anna Richards fell in love with this city when she moved down south from Canberra

Cross-stitch: Sydney Sucks
Melissa Coombs said it, you know it’s true

Traversing the Subway Sauna
Aleczander Gamboa reveals what’s going on behind closed doors in the CBD

The world at your doorstep
You don’t need to get on a plane to explore the best of other cultures

Why do we ignore the homeless?
Jess Glaser questions how we manage to switch off from the visible struggles of others

Photo essay: Rose St Markets
Shannon Ly captures the beauty of this classic Fitzroy tradition

Tapping into a revolution
William Field-Papuga explores the exploding world of craft beer

Max Blackmore
Tamia Toll chats with the graphic designer, illustrator, and stick and poke tattoo artist

How to be creative in Melbourne
There’s no shortage of whacky and boundary-pushing activities in Melbourne, as Mary Harmer explains

Photo essay: The music scene
Beaza Worcau snaps the artists that make up Melbourne’s lively and rich live music scene 

Mysterious, multicultural Melbourne
Nirvana Bhandary describes what it’s like to be the ‘other’

I don’t do drugs. Get over it.
Why should choosing not to partake equal judgement and derision, asks Emily Wilson

Photo essay: Up close
Annaliese Hanjak shares her beautiful and whimsical images

An oral history of the Astor Theatre
Frances Vinall collects the story of this beloved Chapel Street institution, in the words of the people who know it best

Frankie Radford: the Design Kids
Jessica Bong sits down with designer and entrepreneur Frankie Radford

Overheard conversations
Tina Victoria discovers you can hear some amazing things if you stop and listen 

 

 

 

 

 

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